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Sensory Disorders of the Bladder and Urethra by John A. Gosling

Sensory Disorders of the Bladder and Urethra by John A. Gosling

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Author
John A. Gosling
Publisher
Springer
Date of release
Pages
182
ISBN
9783540159193
Binding
Hardcover
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
4
59

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Book review

The anticipation of seeing and having to manage patients suffering from sensory disorders of the urinary tract brings dismay and foreboding to the urologist. This stems from his experience of the time that these patients take up, both at the stage of initial interview and subsequently during numerous consultations over periods of months and years. This and the largely unsatisfactory response to various forms of therapy in the past are reason enough for this bold attempt to define with objectivity the notoriously subjective disorders of interstitial cystitis, urethral syndrome and prostatodynia. In writing this book the principal aim of the authors has been to define these three entities concisely and to describe the investiga­ tional methods which are required to establish the diagnosis in each case. The importance of this cannot be overestimated since, when the label of one or other of these conditions is attached to a patient, further objective consideration of the case is-endangered. The casual attribution of these sensory diagnoses to inappropriate cases is already on record as having dulled clinical awareness and led to oversight of progressive disease and its sometimes avoidable conse­ quences.


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