0000-00-00 00:00:00

The Public International Law Theory of Hans Kelsen: Believing in Universal Law by Jochen von Bernstorff

The Public International Law Theory of Hans Kelsen: Believing in Universal Law by Jochen von Bernstorff

Page Updated:
Book Views: 3

Author
Jochen von Bernstorff
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Date of release
Pages
324
ISBN
9780521516181
Binding
Hardcover
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
3
58

Advertising

Get eBOOK
The Public International Law Theory of Hans Kelsen: Believing in Universal Law

Find and Download Book

Click one of share button to proceed download:
Choose server for download:
Download
Get It!
File size:15 mb
Estimated time:2 min
If not downloading or you getting an error:
  • Try another server.
  • Try to reload page — press F5 on keyboard.
  • Clear browser cache.
  • Clear browser cookies.
  • Try other browser.
  • If you still getting an error — please contact us and we will fix this error ASAP.
Sorry for inconvenience!
For authors or copyright holders
Amazon Affiliate

Go to Removal form

Leave a comment

Book review

This analysis of Hans Kelsen's international law theory takes into account the context of the German international legal discourse in the first half of the twentieth century, including the reactions of Carl Schmitt and other Weimar opponents of Kelsen. The relationship between his Pure Theory of Law and his international law writings is examined, enabling the reader to understand how Kelsen tried to square his own liberal cosmopolitan project with his methodological convictions as laid out in his Pure Theory of Law. Finally, Jochen von Bernstorff discusses the limits and continuing relevance of Kelsenian formalism for international law under the term of ‘reflexive formalism', and offers a reflection on Kelsen's theory of international law against the background of current debates over constitutionalisation, institutionalisation and fragmentation of international law. The book also includes biographical sketches of Hans Kelsen and his main students Alfred Verdross and Joseph L. Kunz.


Readers reviews